Monthly Archives: October 2015

Ending the Tyranny of Expensive Security Tools

My obsession with talking about low-cost security tools all started with an article for TechTarget. It morphed into a session for Interop, then a sponsored webinar (by a vendor, go figure) and finally a longer mega-webinar for Ipspace.net. Maybe it’s because I’ve spent most of my time in the non-profit realm, but I simply hate spending money unnecessarily on products that replicate functionality of something my organization already owns. What follows is an excerpt of a post I wrote for Solarwinds on the topic.

Security tools: sometimes it seems that we never have enough to keep up with the task of protecting the enterprise. Or, at least it seems that way when walking the exhibit floor at most technology conferences. There’s a veritable smorgasbord of tools available, and you could easily spend your entire day looking for the perfect solution for every problem.

But, the truth is, IT teams at most organizations simply don’t have the budget or resources to implement dedicated security tools to meet every need and technical requirement. They’re too busy struggling with Cloud migrations, SaaS deployments, network upgrades, and essentially “keeping the lights on.”

Have you ever actually counted all the security tools your organization already owns? In addition to the licensing and support costs, every new product requires something most IT environments are in short supply of these days—time.

Optimism fades quickly when you’re confronted by the amount of time and effort required to implement and maintain a security tool in most organizations. As a result, these products end up either barely functional or as shelfware, leaving you to wonder if it’s possible to own too many tools.

There has to be a better way.

Maybe it’s time to stop the buying spree and consider whether you really need to implement another security tool. The fear, uncertainty, and doubt (FUD) that drives the need to increase the budget for improving IT security works for only so long. At some point, the enterprise will demand tangible results for the money spent.

Try a little experiment. Pretend that you don’t have any budget for security tools.  You might discover that your organization already owns plenty of products with functionality that can be used for security purposes.

You can read the rest of my rant here.

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Security Training for Cheapskates

During a recent webinar I gave, someone asked how soon I would be doing another one. I was flattered, but responded that because of a full-time job as an architect, my time was limited. “Besides,” I said, “you don’t need to wait for me, there’s plenty of free or inexpensive security training available online.”

Security professionals love to share and show off what they’ve learned. Some of us crave the warm fuzzy of helping our colleagues, while others do it to demonstrate their wicked skills or build their resume. Regardless of the motivation, that means there’s always abundant content to help you learn and grow.

Here’s a list of useful sites that I’ll try to keep updated. If you know of others and would like to contribute or if you think the training is outdated or bad, please let me know and I’ll adjust the list accordingly.

Securitytube.net – a project of security researcher, Vivek Ramachandran.

Hak5.org – Online security show produced by Darren Kitchen (of Pineapple WiFi router fame) and a collection of nerds who demo security tools and hacks. Includes Metasploit Minute with the awesome @Mubix.

OWASP – The Open Web Application Security Project has lots of “how to” guides and videos.

Offensive Security’s Vimeo Channel

Metasploit Unleased, Made for Hackers for Charity, an ethical hacking course provided free of charge to the InfoSec community in an effort to raise funds and awareness for underprivileged children in East Africa.

Georgia Weidman:Bulb Security – creator of the Smartphone Pentest Framework, researcher and author of Penetration Testing: A Hands-on Introduction to Hacking. She offers inexpensive online training in pentesting.

Adrian Crenshaw’s site, Irongeek, with conference and training videos.

Official BlackHat Conference Youtube Channel 

Defcon Youtube Channel 

Chaos Communication Congress videos

OpenSecurityTraining.info – CreativeCommons licensed security training site

Cyber Kung Fu for the Eight (8) Domains of CISSP – Training videos from Larry Greenblatt, a CISSP training guru.

Pentester Academy – video training site available for monthly or yearly subscription fee. Some free content.

Pentester Lab – Free online pentesting courses with practice images.

Penetration Testing Practice Lab – A mindmap of available vulnerable applications and systems practicing pentesting.

ENISA(European Union Agency for Network and Information Security) incident handling training

Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute (SEI) training – low-cost security training from a research, development and training center involved in computer software and network security.

Cybrary – free online IT and security training that grew out of a Kickstarter project.

Udemy, Coursera, edX and many universities offer MOOCs in computer science and information security. You can get a list from MOOC-Online.

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