Danger: Stunt Hacking Ahead

On 4/18, Ars Technica reported on a recent 60 Minutes stunt-hacking episode by some telecom security researchers. During the episode, US representative Ted Lieu had a cell phone intercepted via vulnerabilities in the SS7 network. I’m no voice expert*, but it’s clear that both the 60 Minutes story and the Ars Technica article are pretty muddled attempts to dissect the source of these vulnerabilities. This is probably because trying to understand legacy telephony protocols such as SS7 is only slightly less challenging than reading ancient Sumerian.

Since I was dubious regarding the “findings” from these reports,  I  reached out to my VoIP bestie, @Unregistered436.

Screenshot 2016-04-20 11.33.19

 

While we can argue over how useful media FUD is in getting security issues the attention they deserve, I have other problems with this story:

  • This isn’t new information. Researchers (including the ones appearing in 60 Minutes) have been reporting on problems with SS7 for years. A cursory Google search found the following articles and presentations, including some by the Washington Post.

German Researchers Discover a Flaw That Could Let Anyone Listen to Your Cell Calls 12/18/14

Locating Mobile Phones Using Signalling System #7 1/26/13

For Sale: Systems that Can Secretly Track Where Cellphone Users Go Around the Globe 8/24/14

Toward the HLR, Attacking the SS7 & SIGTRAN Applications H2HC, Sao Paulo, Brazil, December 2009

  • If you’re going to reference critical infrastructure such as the SS7 network, why not discuss how migration efforts with IP convergence in the telco industry relate to this issue and could yield improvements? There are also regulatory concerns which impact the current state of the telecommunications infrastructure as well. Maybe Ted Lieu should start reading all those FCC documents and reports.
  • Legacy protocols don’t get ripped out or fixed overnight (IPv4 anyone?), so the congressman’s call to have someone “fired” is spurious. If security “researchers”  really want things to change, they should contribute to ITU, IEEE and IETF working groups or standards committees and help build better protocols. Or *shudder* take a job with a telecom vendor. We all need to take some ownership to help address these problems.

*If you want to learn more about telecom regulation, you should definitely follow Sherry Lichtenberg. For VoIP and SS7 security, try Patrick McNeil and Philippe Langlois.

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