DevSecOps Myths

I’ve been working in the DevOps space for a few years now and there’s no better way to send me into an episode of nerd rage than to encounter tragically misguided attempts to implement DevSecOps. Generally, this is due to security people who are uneducated in the basics of good DevOps practices and a misunderstanding of the collaboration necessary to be successful with integrating security into the process.

The following is a list of some common DevSecOps myths I’ve encountered:

  • Special tools or software. While DevOps-friendly tools are nice, you generally don’t have to go out and buy a lot of new security software. Often, you can integrate existing controls or even (gasp) use open source. No amount of vendor hype is going to magically add that dash of DevSecOps to your pipelines. To the people going on buying sprees, I have one thing to say: Please.Stop.
  • A separate software development initiative. One of the core values of DevOps is COLLABORATION. If the security team isn’t working with and actively engaged with the DevOps platform team, then you won’t get DevSecOps. These should be aligned and complimentary initiatives.
  • Models, frameworks, lingo or buzzwords. Security people love this stuff, but DevOps is a practical effort to make software delivery faster to support the business. The goal of DevSecOps is to add validation to this process. Period. Stop overcomplicating things.
  • Agilefall, i.e. Waterfall dressed as DevOps/Agile. Agile and DevOps are reality. Both approaches are more than a decade old and for security professionals to be in denial or unfamiliar with their workings is deluded.

What is DevSecOps? It’s an approach that focuses on Security as a Product Feature, not a checkbox. An initiative that includes people, processes and technology to align with Agile/DevOps efforts to match its delivery methods and desired velocity. But let’s take a cue from the DevSecOps Manifesto.

Through Security as Code, we have and will learn that there is simply a better way for security practitioners, like us, to operate and contribute value with less friction. We know we must adapt our ways quickly and foster innovation to ensure data security and privacy issues are not left behind because we were too slow to change.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: