Cloud-Native Consumption Principles

The promises of Cloud are alluring. Organizations are told they can reduce costs through a flexible consumption-based model, which minimizes waste in over-provisioning, while also achieving velocity in the development of new digital products without the dependence on heavy, centralized IT processes. This aligns closely with the goals of a DevOps transformation, which seeks to empower developers to build better software through a distributed operational model that delivers solutions more quickly with less overhead. However, most enterprise cloud journeys begin with a “lift and shift” from the on-premise data center to an IaaS provider. This seems like the easiest and fastest way to begin acclimating to the new environment by finding and leveraging similarities in deployment and consumption of digital assets. While this path may initially seem to expedite adoption, the migration is soon bogged down by the very issues that prompted the organization to adopt cloud: cumbersome, centralized processes that don’t support developers’ need for automation and speed.

With startups, which don’t have the existing processes and organizational hierarchy to be realigned to a new way of working, applications have no barriers to becoming Cloud-Native. They begin that way. Enterprises weren’t initially built around a Cloud model, so the implementation is often based Conway’s Law, the design and provisioning mirroring the existing organizational hierarchy. The only difference being that instead of a server team deploying bare-metal or on-premise virtual machines, they build an instance in the cloud. While there are some incremental gains, much of the latency from human middleware and legacy processes remain. After the short honeymoon based on a PoC or pilot projects, the realities of misaligned business processes grind progress to a halt. This also results in higher spend because cloud resources are not meant to be long-running snowflakes, but ephemeral and immutable. Cloud is made for cattle, not pets.

The source of this friction becomes clear. While cloud is referred to as “Infrastructure as a service,” many assume this is equivalent to data center hosting. However, Cloud is an evolution in the digital delivery model, where bare-metal is abstracted away from the customer, who now consumes resources through web interfaces and APIs. Cloud should be thought of and consumed as a software platform, i.e., Cloud-Native.  As defined by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF):

Cloud-native technologies empower organizations to build and run scalable applications in modern, dynamic environments such as public, private, and hybrid clouds. Containers, service meshes, microservices, immutable infrastructure, and declarative APIs exemplify this approach.

These techniques enable loosely coupled systems that are resilient, manageable, and observable. Combined with robust automation, they allow engineers to make high-impact changes frequently and predictably with minimal toil.

Therefore, to maximize the value of cloud adoption at scale, it is necessary to become Cloud-Native, and the effort must be tightly coupled to DevOps automation efforts.

In 1967, Paul Baran discussed the creation of a “national computer public utility system,” a metered, time-sharing model. Cloud, and by extension Cloud-Native, is the manifestation of that prediction and, as with other utilities, the consumption of “compute as utility” must be distributed and self-service in order to achieve cost benefits. What about governance and security concerns? Cloud Service Providers (CSP) have built-in capabilities to establish policy restrictions at the organization, account, resource and/or identity level. Native security controls can be embedded to function seamlessly, providing the automated monitoring, alerting, and enforcement needed to minimize risk and meet audit requirements. By decoupling compliance from control, these capabilities are more efficiently consumed through the platform via policy-as-code integrated into declarative Infrastructure-as-code (IaC). Alternatively, organizational risk is increased when using manual provisioning, abstraction layers or traditional controls that are not cloud-ready or Cloud-Native with this environment.

In an attempt to ease organizations’ struggle with cloud adoption, Azure and AWS have developed Well-Architected Frameworks to promote better cloud consumption and design. Both consist of five pillars to evaluate the quality of a solution delivery: 

  • Operational excellence
  • Security
  • Reliability
  • Performance (Efficiency)
  • Cost optimization

While helpful, these frameworks fail to communicate the urgent need for automation and tight coupling to the application development lifecycle in order to achieve a successful cloud migration. For example, from the AWS Operational Excellence Pillar, “operations as code” is only listed as a design principle to “limit human error and enable consistent responses to events.”

Ultimately, Cloud at scale, is best consumed as a software platform though the automated development processes essential to DevOps, otherwise the costs of side-channel pipeline provisioning and long-running, inefficiently sized workloads soon outweigh the initial benefits.

To summarize, the principles of a Cloud-Native consumption model include:

  • Automated provisioning of all resources as code through pipelines owned by product teams
  • Distributed self-service to achieve velocity and empower business segments
  • “Shift Everywhere” security through Policy-as-code embedded into the Infrastructure-as-Code
  • Decoupling of compliance from operational control through the use of CSP native capabilities to automate governance, monitoring, alerting and enforcement

To be effective, these principles are best operationalized through the unification of any cloud initiative with a DevOps effort. Otherwise, the cloud effort will be crippled by the existing technology bureaucracy.

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