Security and Ugly Babies

Recently a colleague confessed his frustration to me over the resistance he’s been encountering in a new job as a security architect. He’s been attempting to address security gaps with the operations team, but he’s being treated like a Bond villain and the paranoia and opposition are wearing him down.

It’s a familiar story for those of us in this field. We’re brought into an organization to defend against breaches and engineer solutions to reduce risk, but along the way often discover an architecture held together by bubble gum and shoestring. We point it out, because it’s part of our role, our vocation to protect and serve. Our “reward” is that we usually end up an object of disdain and fear. We become an outcast in the playground, dirt kicked in the face by the rest of IT, as we wonder what went wrong.

We forget that in most cases the infrastructure we criticize isn’t just cabling, silicon and metal. It represents the output of hundreds, sometimes thousands of hours from a team of people. Most of whom want to do good work, but are hampered by tight budgets and limited resources. Maybe they aren’t the best and brightest in their field, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that they don’t care.  I don’t think anyone starts their day by saying, “I’m going to do the worst job possible today.”

Then the security team arrives on the scene, the perpetual critic, we don’t actually build anything. All we do is tell the rest of IT that their baby is ugly. That they should get a new one. Why are we surprised that they’re defensive and hostile? No one wants to hear that their hard work and long hours have resulted in shit.

What we fail to realize is this is our baby too and our feedback would be better received if we were less of a critic and more of an ally.

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3 thoughts on “Security and Ugly Babies

  1. Sergio Caltagirone says:

    Absolutely! Security may have the ugliest baby of them all.

  2. fsmontenegro says:

    Great comment,as usual. I think we’re way past the late 90s-early 2000s mindset of security people telling other IT teams how to do security. It should be much more of a collaboration than a confrontation.

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