Security Vs. Virtualization

Recently, I wrote an article for Network Computing about the challenges of achieving visibility in the virtualized data center.

Security professionals crave data. Application logs, packet captures, audit trails; we’re vampiric in our need for information about what’s occurring in our organizations. Seeking omniscience, we believe that more data will help us detect intrusions, feeding the inner control freak that still believes prevention is within our grasp. We want to see it all, but the ugly reality is that most of us fight the feeling that we’re flying blind.

In the past, we begged for SPAN ports from the network team, frustrated with packet loss. Then we bought expensive security appliances that used prevention techniques and promised line-rate performance, but were often disappointed when they didn’t “fail open,” creating additional points of failure and impacting our credibility with infrastructure teams.

So we upgraded to taps and network packet brokers, hoping this would offer increased flexibility and insight for our security tools while easing fears of unplanned outages. We even created full network visibility layers in the infrastructure, thinking we were finally ahead of the game.

Then we came face-to-face with the nemesis of visibility: virtualization. It became clear that security architecture would need to evolve in order to keep up.

You can read and comment on the rest of the article here.

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